267: BE PREPARED

Preparation is one of the biggest gifts that you and your spouse can give to each other and your family.

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And yet it’s hard to think about our own mortality. People often say that it’s the teenagers that think that they are invincible but in reality most of you think you have all the time in the world.

Be prepared.

When you have a document, Our Family Emergency List, you are setting yourself and your family up for a smoother transition.

Not having this type of information prepared and easily accessible can leave those left behind not only grieving but frustrated, scared and lost as they try and piece things together.

In this week’s show Tony and Alisa talk about what you need to do to be prepared in the event of a family emergency.

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Our Family Emergency List

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4 thoughts on “267: BE PREPARED

  1. Thank you! I just found your podcast last week and just printed this document. My mother-in-law died suddenly last December and we are still dealing with her estate with no will. This document will help us build some peace of mind into our fractured family.

    Thank you again and I look forward to listening to all your podcasts. =)

  2. You asked about a good place to store passwords and that kind of information. I’d recommend either PasswordWallet by Selznick Software, or 1Password.

    These both support multiple platforms, including mobile, and store the information locally (but can sync via cloud). (You want that data file under your control, and ***should*** regularly back it up and archive off a copy, off-site if possible, now and then as well.)

    The nice thing about these is that you can easily have all your critical information with you, even on your phone while on vacation, etc. all securely encrypted. With a bit of care, you can all share the information too (while the apps all support sync, I’ve found it problematic to have too many users getting into the file all at once… so use multiple smaller files per user that only infrequently access, or be sure only one user is making changes at a time, etc.).

    You just have to all know a master password, and the apps make it easy to use a good strong unique password with each service or site (so if one gets hacked, you only need to worry about that one). And, I suppose you could file this password somewhere secure, like a safe or with your documents in case something happens so whoever is taking care of your estate would be able to access it (i.e.: a letter with instructions on where to find the file/app and what that master password is).

    I got thinking about this as a business owner… what happens to all my clients if something happens to me? But, I think a family could also put this kind of technology to good use.

    Thanks, and all the best!

  3. Hello, This is such an important topic and a gift to give to your spouse. So I have to confirm everything you have said.

    We are financial planners and have seen spouses left with young children and little to no life insurance. Even a working spouse needs to consider what happens if their non-working spouse dies–how about a nanny, house cleaner, cook, etc? Your spouse could die or get cancer tomorrow, then it is too late. Don’t underestimate. Insurance is relatively inexpensive and incredibly important!

    Also, as you say, do not forgo doing a will if you cannot decide who will be your children’s guardians. The state will decide in most cases. No one will ever be the perfect replacement for you, but your children will appreciate you planning for them if something happens to you both. I’ve seen young children’s families fighting over them in court. We’ve also told our kids where they would live, so that they understand that their lives would go on and they would still be protected and loved. Note that estate planning is not cheap, but it is so worth it. Make it a priority!

    Great password program is LastPass. We have been using for years and have shared with close relatives in case they need to access. We too have seen someone lose a spouse and not be able to access pictures, accounts, on and on, because they did not know the password to their spouses computer! It has taken years for her to get everything worked out. With the grief of losing a spouse comes and you have to raise young children, it is incredibly difficult pull all this together. Husbands do not keep your wives in the dark; this is not to their benefit.

    Love the list–we’ve got something like this, but you have added things we don’t have. Thank you for doing this!

  4. Thanks so much for this information! Just a little feedback on password storage: real low tech and works well for us. We got a small address book, then alphabetically by site have username/password and keep it on a bookshelf. Super handy when it’s time to update Quicken!